Serious electric scooter accidents double in Malaga

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electric scooters - accidents double in Malaga

The introduction of new traffic rules in Spain for use of electric scooter and bicycles appears counterproductive. Since they can no longer use the pavement, the number of serious accidents in Malaga is double.

New rules introduced in 2021 for the use of e-scooters and bicycles in urban traffic in Spain recognise the e-scooter as personal transport.

Number of serious electric scooter accidents in Malaga doubles

However, since their introduction, the number of serious accidents involving e-scooters and bicycles has doubled in Malaga. Traffic organisations and lawyers believe the very fact that e-scooters and bicycles now have to drive on the road is the cause of this extreme increase.

Since the new regulation, e-scooters and bicycles may not drive on the pavement. The intention is scooters and bikes will use cycle paths or roads where the speed limit is not higher than 30 km/h.

Casa Las Dunas Spain

Road users have to get used to each other and to new rules

Injury lawyer Manuel Temboury says neither motorists nor by electric scooter riders respect the speed limit. Road users also have to get used to bicycles and electric scooters being on the road. All these factors mean the number of accidents with serious injuries has doubled since the introduction of the new rules.

Problems in handling personal injury claims

Not only are more accidents taking place, there are problems with the handling of personal injury claims. E-scooters are not recognised as civil liability vehicles. This causes legal conflicts between parties when determining who was to blame in an accident. Insurance companies often only offer limited coverage for these types of situations.

On Sunday February 14, Ruedas Redonda will organise a ‘bicifestación’ in Malaga. The organisation is calling for a demonstration in which participants call on the municipality and regional government to work towards safer roads: separating motor traffic and introducing a wider network of cycle paths.

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