WMO predicts hottest year ever will be recorded soon

by Lorraine Williamson
hotest year
thirdhome ad

WEATHER – The World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) reports that there is a 90% chance that there will be at least one year in the 2021-2025 period as the hottest year on record. The rise in temperature will probably also be greater than is currently thought. 

This is evident from a new report published by the WMO. The average temperature will be between 0.9 and 1.8 degrees higher in the coming years compared to the average temperature in the pre-industrial era. According to the report, the chance has decreased by 40% that the average temperature will be morethan 1.5 degrees warmer by 2025 compared to the pre-industrial era. That is exactly the maximum limit for global warming recommended in the Paris Climate Agreement. 

Global warming risk increases over time 

However, the report warns, the risk does increase over time. In 2020 global warming of 1.2 degrees was registered compared to the pre-industrial climate. That is almost the same increase as recorded in 2016, the year that was recorded as the hottest ever. 

Casa Las Dunas Spain

Temperature rise no more than 1.5 degrees 

The Paris Climate Agreement has set a target for global warming to remain “well below” 2 degrees in this century. With signatory countries urged to aim for global warming below 1.5 degrees. 

This week’s report from the WMO states it is highly likely temperatures will rise in all parts of the world. Although with the exception of parts of the southern oceans and the North Atlantic Ocean. Also, according to the report, the amount of precipitation will increase in the Northern Hemisphere and the Sahel. And more tropical cyclones will occur over the Atlantic Ocean.

It should not be forgotten extreme weather conditions already occurred in 2020, with thirty storms over the Atlantic Ocean alone. 

You may also like

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More